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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
insists the president did not know. now he is ordering a full review of the nsa surveillance operations and the foreign relations fallout. here is more from our chief national security correspondent jim sciutto. >> reporter: president obama would not confirm the nsa was spying on the phone calls of u.s. allies like germany's chancellor angela merkel. >> the national security operations generally have one purpose and that is to make sure that the american people are safe. i'm making a review to make sure what they are able to do doesn't necessarily mean what they should be doing. >> reporter: senior administration officials tell cnn president obama did not know about the nsa surveillance of merkel and other allies until earlier this year. when he found out he ordered a stop to some of the programs. the democratic chairman of the senate intelligence community dianne feinstein usually an ally of the white house says that is not good enough and wants a total review of all u.s. intelligence programs. here is one explanation former vice president cheney gave cnn's jake tapper. >> we are vulne
of senator barack obama in 2007. but that was then, this is now. the n.s.a., national spy agency, as i call it, is continuing its stealth intrusion into the lives of not only americans but foreign leaders as well. that senator obama once talked about. the n.s.a. has been caught evening dropping on the germans, french, and now news reports say 60 million phone calls in spain were monitored by n.s.a. a bit more history about the n.s.a. and their spying. the department of justice stealthly seized information from 20 different associated press reporters or press phone lines, including some in the u.s. capitol, right up there. the department of justice stealthly seized phone records of fox news reporter, james rosen, his parents, and several fox news phone lines. in the month of january of 2013 billion phone calls were monitored worldwide, and at least three billion of them were phone calls in america. the n.s.a. stealthly seized from verizon business network services millions of telephone records, including the location, numbers, and time of domestic calls. a secret government program called, p
of the nsa and the president's top intelligence chief are both there to testify as anger and suspicion grow over accusations of widespread u.s. spying. the worst of it, tapping the phones of u.s. allies. >> we, all of us in the intelligence community, are very much aware that the recent unauthorized disclosures have raised concerns that you've alluded to, both here in congress and across the nation, about our intelligence activities. we know the public wants to understand how its intelligence community uses its special tools and authorities and to judge whether we can be trusted to use them appropriately. we believe we have been lawful and at the rigorous oversight we've operated under has been effective. >> here are a couple questions. these are the biggies. what did the president know? when did he know it and what specifically depends on who you ask. the senate intelligence committee chaired by diane feinstein, she says, we knew nothing, claiming they were kept in the dark about what the nsa was up to. but other officials say president obama or at least his white house staff knew all abou
an intelligence apparatus . the direction of national intelligence, and nsa director both set to testify about u.s. spying allegations from brazil to germany. randall pinkston joins us live on capital hill, and randall they said trust has to be in their words rebuilt between the u.s. and its allies. are stepping being taken to do that? >> given all of the issues right now, the administration certainly did not need the headache of having it revealed that the u.s. has been spying on some of its top allies. they are meeting with the nsa director, keith alexander who will be testifying later today on intelligence. they will be grilled, both of them, alexander as well as james clapper on the extent of america's spying operations and there will also be the introduction of legislation to scale back to modify the patriot act. this legislation will be introduced by the author of the patriot act, and among other things it will put restrictions on the gathering of metadata, as well as refining the extent to which america can engage in foreign intelligence, and presumably that will take into account spying
need to bring more oversight into what is going on at nsa? i support aggressive oversight of the intelligence community. this is the deal we struck as a country. we have democracy. it is not necessarily completely in harmony with an aggressive intelligence community. we have had to set up institutions and structures where we try to balance these competing national interest. in thethe ways we did it 70's was to create intelligence communities and ensure that all --bers of each community was ultimately it is the president's call. they help make a judgment about what politically we are able to achieve in terms of intelligence collection. . host: if you have questions for our guest, you can call in on the phone lines -- if you want to send us an e- .ail, journal@c-span.org we will take those momentarily. michael allen speaking global strategy hearing d.c.. he is also an author of "linking red." has intelligence gathering and sharing got better after 9/11? guest: absolutely. we have rebuilt the intelligence infrastructure so we can share information better. this is what my book
of the senate intelligence commitee, the democrat, diian feinstein has been a prominent supporter of the nsa, but yesterday, and maybe for the first time, she broke ranks and claimed she is totally opposed to spying on leaders of allies. she also said that the white house told her it would stop the practice. a senior official later said that isn't true, but added the administration is considering the move. katherine herridge is live with us right over here. in europe, they seem all of a sudden to be obsessed with this, hearings and people speaking out. katherine, what else has happened at this hearing? >> well, sheperd, so far really two major headlines from james clapper, the nation's intelligence chief. the first was clearly to make the case that these controversial nsa programs are justified, clapper testified a short time ago that 2500 people were killed by terrorists just this last month, and he used that as a sign that the threat is evolving and growing. let's listen. >> in just this last month, 2,336 people were killed, 1510 injured in pakistan, afghanistan, syria, iraq, and nigeria.
countries. the resolution is expected to be voted on later this month. >> n.s.a. leader edward snowden is speaking up and reaching out. the germans are interested in bringing him to berlin if he tells them about the surveillance of german chancellor angela merkel. >> david chater reports from moscow. >> edward snowden shows every sign of going native. the snapshot showing him enjoying a river cruise in moscow. he held a meeting with an mp from the green party. he said their discussions were revealing. at a press conference the mp said edward snowden would about willing to go germany as a witness to the bugging of angela merkel's phone by the u.s. >> translation: he told me he could imagine coming to germany if it was clear he could remain here in safety. this means granting free passage and asylum. the interior minister could offer this and fulfil the moral obligation to help him. >> it's reported edward snowden is starting a job in st. petersburg as a technical advisor to russia's version of facebook. he may not be happy with the news that the federal security service in moscow is be
. angry allies.>>> good morning. angry allies. the nsa scandal getting even wider this morning. as many as 35 world leaders spied on by the u.s. some now demanding answers. so what did president obama know and when? >>> breaking news overnight. the doctor convicted in michael jackson's death free from jail. why conrad murray was freed after serving only half his sentence. >>> and ground breaker. rock icon lou reed is remembered this morning after passing away at the age of 71. his influence on a generation of artists today, monday, october 28th, 2013. >> announcer: from nbc news, this is "today." with matt lauer and savannah guthrie live from studio 1a in rockefeller plaza. >>> good morning, welcome to "today" on a monday morning. >> i'm savannah guthrie alongside al roker and natalee moralis. >> hey, sugar, take a walk on the wild side. >> can we turn that up a bit. >> i remember playing that m freshman year as a disc jockey. great song. >> tributes are pouring all in. we'll have more on the death of lou reed. >>> new revelations on the nsa spying program. this morning, some of our clo
nowhere. the timing is unfortunate. >> when most americans hear about the drone strikes and the n.s.a. scandals, a lot of people shrug. what are they missing? >> they don't see the consequences of this in their own lives. there are no drone strikes in the united states. one thing that is changing in the u.s. - the t.s.a. has started a process of looking at people before they fly. what they are doing is going through government and private databases. they are looking at property records, all kinds of private information to decide whether you should be allowed to board your plane. as that comes home, as people see it more in the united states, they'll ask questions about the level of surveillance. >> i'm meteorologist dave warren. we are talking about what you could wake up tomorrow morning. there's a black spot on one of the views from space. this is a while ago. this is what the eclipse looks like, the shadow of the mon on the surface of the earth. this is where the greatest eclipse will be, off the ost of av -- coast of africa. you'll see a park eclips along the east coast. sunrise a
that they felt that way in covering this important story in mali. >> n.s.a. whistle blower edward snowden sounding off. >> we're going to tell you what's in his open letter. why he's asking the u.s. for clemency. >> it feels like 2012 all over again. mitt romney attacking president obama over health care. why the former presidential candidate jumped into the debate. >> a special look at aging around the globe, starting in afghanistan, where life expectancy is among the lowest in the world. >> we're taking a live look at egypt right now. the protests there, you can see breaking up very quickly, just an hour ago. we saw hundreds of people outside of the courthouse where mohamed morsi's trial has just been adjourned to the new year. we'll be right back. >> good morning. welcome back to aljazeera america. >> some democrats in washington are worried they're going to lose jobs over the ongoing n.s.a. scandal. we'll talk with an experienced democratic strategist. >> let's get a look at what temperatures we can expect to see across the nation. i'm he can specking a lot of low temperatures. >> a l
. >> reporter: the head of the nsa warned that new limits on u.s. espionage could be dangerous. >> is much more important for this country that we defend this nation and take the beatings than to give up on a program that would result in this nation being attacked. >> reporter: the u.s. has been under fire over reports the u.s. collected tens of millions of phone records of citizens in france and spain. the u.s. spy chiefs flatly denied that. it turns out those records were collected by french and spanish intelligence, not by the united states. jonathan karl, abc news, the white house. >>> and now to those health care issues. kathleen sebelius, the person in charge of the botched health care rollout, is testifying on capitol hill today. she's expected to blame the contractors who built the problem-plagued website. yesterday, for the first time, the obama administration issued a direct apology for healthcare.gov. >> i want to apologize to you that the website has not worked as well as it should. >> she was also grilled about a wave of cancellation notices hitting small businesses and individuals
. no accountability. n.s.a. spying on foreign leaders, u.s. officials claimed the president did not know about this. the president refuses to say whether he knew or not, but anyway, lower level operatives officially blamed. n.s.a. spying on americans, the president claims he did not know the extent of spying on americans. lower level operatives blamed, no accountability. mr. speaker, exactly who is running the country? lower level operatives? has the government gone wild? are they operating without the knowledge of the white house? is the president out of tune with what's taking place within his own administration? or is he aware of those actions? if the president was unaware of all of this, the white house needs to hold people accountable, hold these lower level operatives accountable for their actions, their improper actions, their incompetence. the white house needs to fix this out-of-control government immediately. the white house needs to take responsibility for the actions of his administration and quit blaming others and lower level operatives. that is the white house's responsibility. after
of state john kerry weighs in on the spy activities of the national security agency, saying the n.s.a. went too far. >>> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm david shuster, here is a look at the headlines - witnesses describe chaos in terminal 3 of los angeles international airport after a gunman opened fire this morning morning. this video from tmz showed people running after hearing the shots. an agent was killed. several others were wounded. the federal bureau of investigation identified the gunman as 23-year-old paul ciancia of pennsville new jersey. president obama said he and nouri al-maliki, iraqi prime minister shook hands and discussed how the two can work together to fight al qaeda. nouri al-maliki is seeking military aid from the united states to fight the sebbing tare have been violence. >> a u.s. drone missile attack killed this man, hakimullah mehsud, one of the c.i.a.'s most wanted men. the u.s. accused him of killing thousands, and put a $5 million bounty on his head. hakimullah mehsud was suspected of planning an attack killing employees at a u.s. base in afghanistan. th
. >> congratulations, senator. welcome. [cheers and applause] [applause] >> this is a tough time for nsa where they said, what are you doing or why are you doing it? here's what we do. when we get together, we don't -- well, maybe a couple times we whine -- but we actually say it is much more important for this country that we defend the nation and take the beatings than it is to give up a program that would result in this nation being attackedded. we would rather be here in front of you today telling you why we defended these programs than having begin them up and have our nation or our allies be attacked and people killed. >> this weekend on c-span, intelligence officials defend the nsa's surveillance program on a house intelligence committee hearing. saturday morning at ten eastern. live sunday on c-span2, your calls and comments for kitty kelly, best selling author of unauthorized biographies, nancy reagan, the british royal family, the bush family, and others at noon on booktv's "in-depth," and on c-span3's american history tv, each weekend in november, remembering john f. kennedy, eyewit
-ed in "the l.a. times." you called for changes to be made to the nsa's massive phone data gathering program and say it's the evidence that it has made us safer is limited. instead it appears that the utility of the metadata program has been conflated with the success of other collection efforts. how do you determine how much surveillance, then, is too much? >> i think we have to weigh what is the size of the program, what is the magnitude of the collection and what are the results it's getting? and even more than that, even if it met that test, even if the metadata program was very successful, we also have to ask, is it necessary to collect all this data or can the program be restructured? in my view, the program can be restructured in a way that has the telecommunications providers retain their own data. i doesn't require the government to get all that data. when we suspect that a phone number is connected to a plot, then we go to the phone company, much as we would do in a criminal investigation. so i think we can get the same information we need. we can continue to protect the country. w
is the from page of the "washington post" on the latest involving those leaks from former nsa contractor edward snowden. host: if you want to read more on that story, that is the front page of the "washington post." the front page of today's "usa just a little bit from that piece. host: that story in today's "usa today." on this subject of the hearings yesterday, play more calls and comments, some e-mails coming in. if you watched the hearing, you know a lot more about how wonderful it is that millions more will be covered. ,ecretary sebelius was direct and the congress representatives showed their hate and anger and. mona this morning -- hate and ignorance. mona this morning e-mailing entered we go to stanley on our line for democrats. good morning. caller: happy thursday. enemy and it is us. it is amazing be caller's and a lack of knowledge. i mean, they are basically regurgitating partyline talking points. we need to do a lot more research and a lot more looking into the real facts. i think sebelius did an excellent job of answering the questions. by the way, i think history will rate
if they will be charged. the cause is still under investigation. nsa leaker edward snowden has a message for the u.s. stop treating me like a trader. -- traitor. snowden is under temporary asylum in russia for leaking the nsa's secret playbook and faces espionage charges in the u.s. tucker. >> hey, clayton what needs to be done to prevent these kind of attacks. jonathan gillian. thank you for joining thus morning. >> good to be with you. >> i want to put up on the scene -- screen. there have been couple of shootings. gunman killed himself in houston. 2010, new orleans, one dead, one wounded and famously in los angeles 2002, two dead and three wounded. do you see a pattern here? >> well, obviously we see a pattern of individuals that are drawn to this for some reason. i'm not exactly clear why people who have rage are drawn to this. but, yeah, we definitely do see an issue with this. and i think probably one of the things that allows people to go there and do or draws them there is the access to the airport. and the importance of the airport. so they probably look at this as something that almost like a go
calling this president a liar because so many things, you know, benghazi, the n.s.a., the i.r.s., and now this whole health care bill is such a farce. it is a joke. guest: can you tell me what the president lied about when it comes to benghazi? caller: the first thing, we don't know what he was doing. guest: no, we're talking about lying. you said the president was lying about benghazi. can you give an example? caller: everybody covers for him. he doesn't have to answer for anything. all he ever does, he's out campaigning all the time and he's supposed to be a president. i'd like to ask you, why is he a president? he doesn't lead. he doesn't do anything. all he does is go out there and agitate people. he's a community agitator. he has divided this country and we don't want anything part of your leftist progressive views. host: let's give him a chance to respond. guest: well, i don't know how to respond to that. she wanted to talk about lying but she didn't have an example. if you want to get into this stuff, i think you need to be -- have some specifics. but she says the president doesn't
't get enough. especially now we're talking about nsa and spying and i can't think of a more appropriate time for this. i'm fascinated by the individuals behind these actions here. >> the secret 6? >> the actual secret six. agent 355, there is a female spy. >> yes. >> we still don't know her name. tell us about her. >> what you have is six spies in the middle of the war, we almost lost the entire thing out of new york. washington gets blown out of new york, we're down to 3,000 men. so he says to get back into new york and take on 40,000 british, i have to set autopsy spy ring. so he's got to find someone who knows new york city. so he gets his trusted lieutenant, talmadge, and he says, listen, find some people we can trust. we've got to get into new york. i got to find out what's going on. one of the people he gets is this agent 355. all we know is she's a lady and she infiltrated the social scene, like you picture in new york city now and she listened and she actually interacted, went to the parties where she overheard people talking about a general ready to give up west point, she ends
-- ns -- n.s.a. and sinced at administration has said there was unspecified inaccuracies in these reports about the revelations, can you say that that was what you were talking about? >> you want to specify what the unspecified inaccuracies might be? we have important cooperative relationships with the security agencies and intelligence agencies of other nations, of allied nations. i'm not going to get into the specific alleged activities, intelligence activities, of the united states or our allies. we're obviously more broadly engaged in a review as i discussed at length yesterday of our intelligence gathering activities, mindful of the fact that because of the explosion in our technological capacities , we need to look at and make sure that we are not just gathering intelligence because we can, but we're gathering it because we need it specifically and that review is under way at the president's direction and will be completed by the end of the year. >> one of the things that officials say of the review is the surveillance of allied heads of state. is the administration
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)